Showing posts with label unraveling oriental rug repair. Show all posts
Showing posts with label unraveling oriental rug repair. Show all posts

Monday, December 14, 2020

Moroccan Rug - Binding Comes Undone

 


A rug can withstand decades of daily life with minimal maintenance.  Occasionally, however, a rug will need a little more than a good cleaning to keep it as beautiful and structurally sound as it needs to be.  This is usually in the form of reinforcement of the edges, especially the fringed edges.  Over the years, the original binding that most weavers place along the fringed edges will start to come undone.  This is sometimes hastened by aggressive vacuuming, or children or pets tugging at the edges.  If this is repaired before any of the pile becomes compromised, this is a straightforward repair.  And it will take considerably less time, and money, to repair a binding along a fringed edge than it would to reknot a missing or damaged area of the pile.  This is the reason we always recommend that binding is always done as soon as it becomes damaged - namely to avoid more significant damage to the rug itself.  As the old adage goes, a stitch in time saves nine (and sometimes more!).  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com 

Sunday, February 26, 2012

Rug Fringe Repair

Repairing fringe damage is one of the most common forms of care that we provide.  Fringes are particularly vulnerable to damage - whether through aggressive vacuuming, the pulling of heavy furniture, or just ordinary wear.   As is often the case, the sooner that we can repair and/or restore a damaged fringe, the easier the repair will be.  The series of photos below illustrate a recent repair we did for a client.  In the first picture, the small damaged area is visible.  Not only was the fringe compromised, but part of the pile was also damaged and missing.  As the pictures illustrate, we rebuilt the warp and reknotted the missing pile.  Finally, we bound the fringe so as to minimize the risk of unraveling.




Thursday, July 7, 2011

How to bind unraveling fringes when the fringes are very short


We recently got a question from one of our readers, Dave Wagner, inquiring how to bind fringes to prevent further unraveling when the fringes are already quite short, most often by years of wear and tear.  In these instances, I use cotton in between every few knots along the edge of the rug as shown in the picture below:
 


On the front side of the rug, the cotton thread disappears into the pile, but on the reverse the binding is more evident as the picture illustrates.  This binding technique is very effective, but as usual, clients must take care not to vacuum fringes or pull the binding out so as not to leave fringes vulnerable to damage. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Sunday, May 29, 2011

How to Protect a Rug's Fringes


One of the most common problem areas on rugs are the fringes, which are essentially extra warp fibers.  Most of the rug restoration work that I do is due to compromised fringes.  A simple preventative measure that many people can, but often fail to do is to bind the fringes so as to prevent any future unraveling.  Fringe binding is a bit time consuming, but is much less time consuming and certainly less costly than any restoration due to an unraveled fringe and field.  Binding should be done before any damage to the border of the rug. And, as a bonus, fringe binding often can give a rug a nice outline adding to, rather than taking away from, the rug's existing beauty. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Missing or Damaged Fringes in a Handmade Carpet


Repairing and fixing worn edges of a carpet is significantly easier if the carpet's fringes are still intact.  The carpet above has a common form of fringe damage - notice how much shorter the fringes are on the right side of the picture compared to the left side.  In situations like these, I always recommend clients to have a professional restorer bind the fringes so as to prevent the actual pile from being damaged.  Repairing fringes and binding fringes is much easier (and therefore less time consuming, and less expensive) than having to repair holes along the edges of the carpet pile.   I'm not sure what exactly caused the fringes of this carpet to become so shortened - I suspect that perhaps a careless vacuum cleaning may have been the culprit.  But sometimes it's just time and normal wear and tear that lead to damaged and missing fringes.  Regardless of the cause, if you notice that your rug's fringes are very short in one area and dangerously close to leaving an edge almost fringe-less, take your piece to a restorer who can help you prevent further damage to your handmade carpet.

www.traditionalrugrepair.com