Showing posts with label Afghan rug restoration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Afghan rug restoration. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Kilim Repair

 


After all these years, I still get excited when I start a new kilim restoration project.  I enjoy every stage of the process, including the yarn selection that is so critical to how the restoration looks when it is completed.  While it is never possible to find a perfect match, we generally have success in making sure that the shade we choose will allow the restoration to blend into the original piece as much as possible.  Whenever I start something new, I always marvel that it takes so few tools to create, or in this case, restore, something that will likely outlive our generation by so many years.  It's a way of connecting to the past, and to the future.  And in that fact, I find great peace and beauty. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Undoing an Old Repair - Afghan Rug Restoration Project Final Result




After many hours of weaving and knotting, we completed our Afghan rug restoration project.  Pictured above is the result.  You will note from the final result picture (as well as from our in progress pictures) that the restoration is integrated into the original structure of the rug thereby making it both more aesthetically pleasing and significantly more durable.  With time, the very slight variation in the red yarns should appear even more like the original rug once the rug is exposed to some sunlight.  The photos below show the original patch before repair.











Sunday, July 3, 2016

Undoing an old Repair - Afghan Rug Restoration Project In Progress









As is almost always the case, we first professionally cleaned the rug before we began our latest Afghan rug restoration project.  We then extracted the old patch so that we could restore the area properly.  Next, we carefully reconstructed the warp (the white vertical strands in the photo below).


Subsequently, we reconstructed the weft (the brown horizontal yarns).  Once the warp and weft were reconstructed, they formed a grid-like structure upon which we then reknotted the pile.  Below is a photo of the weft reconstruction in progress.


The photo below illustrates the benefits of this kind of restoration.  The warp and weft are not superficially attached to the rug; rather, they are integrated into the structure of the original rug making this kind of restoration both more aesthetically pleasing, but also more long-lasting.  Indeed, absent any extraordinary stress on the area, this restoration will last the life of the rug if not longer.   





When the warp and weft reconstruction were completed, we began reknotting the pile.  The long red vertical yarns (the fuzzy section in the bottom right hand corner of the photo below) is the reconstructed pile in progress.



Below is a view of the reconstructed pile taken from the back of the rug.



Below are photos of the reconstructed pile before we cut back the yarns.



Below is the completed pile before we cut back the yarns so that they are the same length of the original rug (the restored section almost looks like a Turkish Tulu which are very much in vogue these days).   In our next post we will share a photo of the result of this Afghan rug restoration project.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com



Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Afghan Kilim Chewed by Dog - Repair in Progress




After professionally cleaning this lovely Afghan kilim, we began reconstructing the warp (the vertical brownish-greyish vertical fibers in the photos above and below).  The photo below shows the completed warp reconstruction.  


Once the warp reconstruction was completed, we began the weft reconstruction.  The weft reconstruction includes the motif reconstruction.  We always strive to be sure to use yarns as close in color to the colors of the original kilim so as to minimize the visibility of the repair.  A great compliment to us is when clients can't find our repairs.


Below is another photo of our weft reconstruction in progress.  This lovely Afghan kilim was almost ready to go home to its hungry puppy! --www.traditionalrugrepair.com


Monday, August 5, 2013

Afghan Rug Repair - in progress





As our last post showed, this Afghan rug's fringe was chewed by a puppy, causing damage not only to the fringe, but also to a section of the knotted pile.


Our first step in the Afghan rug repair was to eliminate all of the damaged fibers and then rebuilding the  compromised and missing cotton warp (the white vertical strands pictured above from the backside of the rug).



Above is a picture of the recreated and extended warp affixed to a temporary wooden loom.



Next, we rebuilt the weft, the horizontal strands that complete the grid like structure pictured above.


After completing the grid like base of the warp and weft, the next step in our Afghan rug restoration was to reknot the missing pile.  Matching the yarns to the original rug was a challenge, as the colors of the rug when viewed from one side look very light, but when viewed from the opposite side, the colors seem darker.  Many rugs have a similar color variation, but this variation is much more pronounced in some Afghan rugs, such as this one.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Sunday, August 4, 2013

Afghan Rug Repair - Before



As many owners of fine rugs and kilims know, they are extremely durable and can last for decades with   just minimal care.  The most vulnerable areas of a handmade rug are its edges - both the fringes and selvages.  The edges are generally subjected to the most significant wear and tear, aggressive vacuuming, and, in this rug's case, the hungriest of puppies.  The puppy here managed to rip away the fringe's binding and pull out the knots of a portion of the pile.  Some of the cotton warp was ripped out as well.   In our next post, we will detail how we repaired the damage to this hand knotted Afghan rug caused by a puppy's appetite.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com