Monday, April 10, 2017

Moth Damage Persian Rug Repair


We professionally cleaned this great vibrant rug to remove the moth larvae and subsequently began our repair.  We reconstructed the warp, weft, and pile.  The shaggy section in the pictures above and below are the reknotted pile before we cut down the yarns.  It's hard to tell from the pictures, but beneath those extra long yarns is our attempt to match the pattern and color palette of the original rug. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com







Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Moth Damaged Persian Rug Repair



Spring is upon us and many of us are getting ready to do our biannual or annual deep cleaning.  It's a perfect occasion to lift heavy furniture off our handmade rugs for a thorough rug inspection and to retrieve all rugs from storage to make sure they're still moth free.  Minor moth infestation can be readily eradicated with a thorough professional cleaning.  Once an infestation is allowed to continue unaddressed, moths can eat through significant areas of the pile, as with the rug pictured above and below.  In the next few posts, we will show how we repaired this moth damaged Persian rug. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com


Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Wine Stain on an Oriental Rug - What Can Be Done


Spilling anything on an Oriental rug can be a very stressful experience.  But occasional spills are almost unavoidable, especially if you are lucky enough to enjoy Oriental rugs in a family room, living room, and, particularly, a dining room.  Over the years, we have helped clients with a wide range of spills and resulting stains - juice, milk, chocolate, coffee, cleaning products, and more.  Among the most challenging stains are those caused by red wine - the culprit that caused the stain in the rug pictured above.   

What should you do when you spill red wine on a beloved Persian rug (or any other kind of hand made wool or silk rug)?  First, and most importantly, blot up the excess liquid immediately.  Use a white towel or paper towels.  Do not rub.  This is particularly important if the spill covers a multi-colored area.  Rubbing may not only set the stain into the rug's fibers, but may also cause the rug's dyes to run.  Second, lift the rug and dry the area below the rug.  You do not want to allow the wine to stain the rug from behind.  Third, contact a professional oriental rug cleaner immediately.  

 For the wine stain pictured above, we first addressed the stain though a rug stain removal process.  Subsequently, we professionally cleaned the entire rug.  Sometimes clients will ask if we can treat just the affected area only and forego cleaning the entire rug, but that is not possible as the cleaning of the entire rug allows the treated area to blend into the rest of the rug.  Below, is a photo of the same area after our stain removal process and professional cleaning of the wine stained rug.  While there is no way to guarantee complete removal of a stain as difficult as one caused by red wine, generally stain removal and a professional cleaning can greatly minimize the appearance of the stain.  


As for that glass, or bottle (!), of wine that was spilled - it's too bad that there's nothing that can be done about getting it back!  -www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Saturday, February 18, 2017

My Dog Bit My Rug - Final Results


So to recap, here is what the rug looked like after being bitten by our client's dog.


Below is a photo that captures our rug repair mid-process while we reconstructed the warp and weft.


Next, below is a photo of what the rug looked like as we knotted the pile.


And, finally, below are photos (from the front and back) of the repaired area.  Let's hope the repair isn't tasty to anyone! --www.traditionalrugrepair.com



Friday, February 17, 2017

My Dog Bit My Rug - Repair in Progress


After professionally cleaning this Kazak rug, we removed all the yarns that had been damaged by our client's dog.  (Of course, the dog had already achieved a bit of success in that regard.)  We then rebuilt the warp and weft, the white square area shown below.



Lastly, we then reknotted the pile striving to match the new yarns to the rug's original lovely colors.  The photo below shows the reknotting in progress, before we cut down the reknotted pile to the same length of the original pile. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com



             
    




Thursday, February 9, 2017

My Dog Bit My Rug - What Do I Do?


Many of our projects have come to us thanks to hungry or rambunctious pets, especially dogs.  This Caucasian rug, which had a particularly lovely color palette, was damaged along its side by its owner's dog.  The selvage and a section of the pile along the border was bitten off entirely.  The photos show the bitten areas from the back of the rug.  In our next posts, we will share how we repaired this (delicious?) rug.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com


Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Repairing a Moth Damaged Beni Ourain Rug - Final Result



After reconstructing the warp and weft, we reknotted the pile.  Matching the yarns we use for our projects is always a challenge.  Above is a photo of the repaired rug after we completed the reknotting process.  Below is the repaired area as seen from the back of the rug.




As a reminder, this is what this moth damaged Moroccan rug looked like before we began our repair process.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com



Monday, January 30, 2017

Repairing A Moth Damaged Beni Ourain Rug - Mid Process



After professionally cleaning the moth infested Beni Ourain rug, we extracted all the damaged fibers and began the repair process.  As the photos above and below show, we first reconstructed the warp and weft, the grid-like structure upon which we could build the pile.  




Below you can see the reconstructed warp and weft from the front side of the rug.



Now the reknotting of the pile can begin.  In our next post, we will share our final result of this Beni Ourain rug repair. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com




Sunday, January 29, 2017

Repairing a Moroccan Beni Ourain Rug - Before Pictures



Flip through any shelter magazine or turn on any HGTV show and you'll undoubtedly come across a lovely Moroccan Beni Ourain rug or two (or three, or four?).   Beni Ourain rugs - with their muted palettes and simple geometric motifs - are indeed quite lovely.  They are fantastic rugs to decorate around as they ground a space while lending a room instant texture and character.  They single-handedly give a room a sense of hygge that seems to be THE thing that everyone wants in their 2017 home.  I personally love Beni Ourain rugs and appreciate how they complement my more colorful Turkish and Persian rugs so beautifully.  The one drawback of Beni Ourain rugs is that their lovely thick pile is attractive not only to us lovers of all things beautiful, but also to moths.  A large section of this Beni Ourain rug (almost 2' x 3') was eaten by moths.  In the following posts, we will share how we restored it to its former glory.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com



Sunday, January 22, 2017

Moth Damaged Rug - Repair Result


The first step in any project that involves addressing moth damage is to thoroughly clean the affected rug.  For this rug, after we completed the professional cleaning, we then rebuilt and reinforced any part of the warp and weft that was damaged and reknotted the damaged and compromised pile.  The photo below shows the rug as we reknotted the pile.  Note the long strands of yarn.


Finally, after reknotting the pile, we cut down the long yarns and revealed the final result, shown below.  





Sunday, January 1, 2017

When You Leave Your Home (and Rugs) For a Few Months


It's summer.  You're going to go away for a few months to relax, reenergize, restore yourself so you can navigate the vibrant city once again.  How do you prepare your winter home?  You empty your refrigerator, throw away all your trash, maybe do a good deep cleaning, and lock your windows.  Right before you leave, you take a last look around to make sure you haven't forgotten anything, lock your door, and leave hoping you will find everything just as you left it when you get back.  Most of the time, you're lucky.  But every once in a while, you come home, unpack, and after a few days, maybe even a few weeks, you start getting the sense that someone was left behind to work while you vacationed.  You might see a wayward moth flying around your closet.  Or maybe you notice a small hole in a wool sweater.  Or (and this is where we come in) you move your sofa to vacuum your rug, and you notice a patch of white where there was once your rug.   Or even worse - you move your sofa to uncover the rug that is beneath it (which is kept in a dark and confined area - a perfect place for hungry moths to eat), and you notice that there are white sticky larvae moving around your rug feasting themselves on your prized hand knotted rug as you watch in a state of disgust and disbelief.  It's disconcerting, to be sure, but it's imperative that you take action swiftly.   The first step is to immediately have your rugs (and all affected woolen products) cleaned immediately.  The next step is to assess the damage.  The picture above is a rug that suffered such a fate.  In our next posts, we will share how we cared for this lovely Turkish rug. --

www.traditionalrugrepair.com