Thursday, April 24, 2014

Spring Cleaning Tips: How To Minimize The Risk of Moth Damage in Your Wool Rugs and Kilims

If you live on the East Coast and survived this difficult winter, you - like me - must be happy that spring has finally arrived.  The snow finally has stopped falling, the weather has begun to warm, and there are even hints of flowers and greenery blooming.  Amidst all the wonderful beginnings that spring brings, there is one danger that peaks around this time that threatens to damage - even destroy - our beloved wool rugs, wool kilims, and wool textiles.  What is this silent and deceptively tiny danger?  Moths.

Moths have the potential to silently, but thoroughly, eat through your most precious wool rugs.  What can you do to prevent moths from damaging your wool rugs?  Below is a list of tips to minimize the danger posed by moths:

  1. Thoroughly inspect your wool rugs and kilims at least once every three months.  Know what to look for.  Below is a picture of a live moth infestation.  Look also for loosened knots of wool.  Loosened and compromised knots might indicate that moths have begun their destructive activity.  Note also that moths seem to have a preference for certain colors (actually, a preference for the dyes used to create certain colors).  Therefore, sometimes moth damage will look like someone has carved out certain colors but left others alone.
  2. Vacuum your rugs regularly.  Professionally clean your rugs every two years or so, or more often if the rug is in a highly-trafficked area.  Clean rugs that enjoy a bright and well-ventilated space are rarely subjected to moth damage.
  3. Avoid storing rugs for any extended period of time.  If you must store your rugs, do so in an area that allows the rugs to breathe and be exposed to light and air.  Never wrap your rugs in plastic and store them in a dark closet.  This is the worst way to store rugs as the dark, oxygen-deprived, humid environment creates the perfect environment for moths to flourish and begin their destructive activity.
  4. Isolate any rugs that show signs of a live moth infestation to avoid spreading the moths to other rugs or woolen products.
With minimal care and occasional monitoring, you can protect your rugs, kilims, and other wool textiles against the small and powerful moth.






www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Antique Turkish Tulu Rug Restoration - Final Result




As we highlighted in our recent posts, after professionally cleaning the antique Turkish Tulu rug, we reconstructed the missing warp and weft.  We then started knotting the Tulu pile and left the yarns loose in the same "shag" style of the original Tulu.  The pictures below were taken in different lights and therefore appear to be of different colors, but they are of the same area of the rug.



Below is a picture after we started knotting the missing pile.  As you can see, there is still visible warp and weft on which we had to knot more pile.


Finally, below is the final result of our antique Turkish Tulu rug restoration.  Again, the different light that we used to take the pictures makes the rug's colors seem different, but they are the same color.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com