Saturday, February 8, 2014

Antique Turkish Kilim Cushion Cover (Cuval) Repair - After



The result of our latest antique Turkish kilim cushion restoration is pictured above.  As a reminder, below is the cushion before we commenced the restoration.




To repair this fine Konya cuval, we first professionally cleaned the kilim cushion so that we could choose yarns for the restoration that would match the cleaned yarns of the original cushion.  We were fortunate to find a similarly aged Konya kilim that was beyond repair.  We unraveled the yarns from that kilim to use in this restoration.  We reconstructed the damaged warp and weft taking care to rebuild the motifs to match the original motifs woven into the cushion.  The brown diagonal "stripe" was the major focus of the restoration.  Now that this beautiful Turkish kilim cushion is restored, it can be stuffed with either cotton or other form of batting, and enjoyed for another generation.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com




Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Antique Turkish Kilim Cushion Cover (Cuval) Repair - Before



The flat woven technique has been used for centuries to make a wide variety of gorgeous textiles - from kilim floor coverings to tent covers, tent dividers, hay bags, saddle bags, tapestries,  salt bags, and cushion covers also known as cuvals (pronounced chuvals).  Pictured above and below is a beautiful example of a hand woven cuval from the Konya region of Turkey.  It was made circa 1910-1920 with all vegetable dyed, one ply, hand-spun wool.  Pieces such as this have become very collectible in recent years.  As you can see from the photos, this cuval, with its stunning muted palette was in good condition except for a central row where the warp and weft was severely compromised.  The picture below with the white background highlights the damaged area.

To restore a piece like this, we strive to use yarn from a similarly aged piece, if possible.  The reason for this is that new yarn would be too bold in color tone and would not allow the restored area to "blend" into the original.  Furthermore, we strive to use yarn colored in the same manner (i.e., with vegetable dyes) and constructed in the same way (i.e., single ply and hand spun).  For this project, we sourced the yarns we used in the restoration from another antique Konya kilim that was beyond restoration.   This highlights yet another wonderful benefit of owning and collecting kilims - even when they are old and seemingly beyond utility, they can still be used to restore and repair other kilims.  Nothing ever needs to go to waste - a rare, and wonderful feat in today's world where so much seems to be disposable.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com




Saturday, February 1, 2014

Persian Rug Restoration - After


After professionally cleaning the rug, we were ready to commence with the restoration.  We always recommend cleaning a rug before undertaking any repair or restoration for a few reasons.  First, yarns used in restored areas should match the clean yarns of the rest of the rug.  Second, dirt particles embedded within the pile of soiled rugs can rub against the fibers and compromise their integrity thereby increasing the chances of damage from occurring.  

After cleaning, we rebuilt the warp and weft that had been damaged.  We then reknotted the pile.  The picture above is of the restored area, as seen from the front side of the rug.  Below is a picture of the same area as seen from the reverse side of the rug.




And, just a reminder, below are pictures of the damaged areas (from the front and back) before our restoration.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com