Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Kilim Restoration - Result and a Recipe to Follow


This is the completed kilim restoration (taken from the back side of the kilim).  Unfortunately, I did not photograph the front side before returning it to my client!  Still, it gives you an idea of the final product.  If you recall, this is what it looked like before:
So, if you're taking notes, these are the steps I took:  1) kilim cleaning; 2) matching the yarns; 3) rebuilding the warp; and 4) weaving.  Follow those 4 steps, invest lots of time, lots of patience, and lots of love for the art and kilim itself, and you'll be restoring pieces for future generations to use and treasure.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Saturday, May 15, 2010

Kilim Restoration - After the Kilim Cleaning - Mid Process

After the kilim cleaning has been completed, I rebuilt the warp (the horizontal white lines in the picture above), and am weaving in the weft to recreate the missing pattern.  Matching the yarns exactly was not possible, but I'm happy with the result so far.  This kilim is a beautiful tightly woven kilim from the Caucasus and a joy to work on.  Come back for pictures of the "after" shot once the kilim restoration is completed. --www.traditionalrugrepair.com

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

Another Kilim Restoration - The Before Picture

I recently completed another kilim repair/restoration project.  This time, I repaired a beautiful kilim from the Caucuses.  As you can see, the entire warp and weft were missing in a section of the kilim.  As I have written in earlier blog posts, the beginning of any rug repair or rug restoration (or kilim repair or kilim restoration) begins with finding the right yarns.  But, generally, it's also important to make sure that repair and restoration is done after any necessary rug cleaning or kilim cleaning.  This way, the yarns used in the repair or restoration match the clean rug or kilim.  Come back soon to see how this project turned out! --www.traditionalrugrepair.com.

Monday, May 3, 2010

Rug Cleaning - Fringes

If you own a handknotted rug that has cotton warp (and therefore cotton fringes), you'll know that the fringes are the first part of a rug that will need to be cleaned as they become dirty, grayish in color, and seem to catch all the dust from your home.  When you send your rug to a rug cleaner, please ask him or her how they will wash the cotton fringes.  Beware of anyone who guarantees you shockingly white fringes after rug cleaning - they may intend to use bleach to clean your rug.  Using bleach in the rug cleaning process may damage the cotton and may make the cotton fibers more vulnerable to fraying.   It's better to have clean, albeit not strikingly white, fringes, and have your rug last you a lifetime.  --www.traditionalrugrepair.com